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School Of Podcasting

Established in 2005 if you want to learn about podcasting this is the show for you. It's been described by many as the most entertaining and unique of all the "Podcast About Podcasting." Dave Jackson gets to the point and talks about podcasting. This could ways to plan a successful launch that will get you ranking high in iTunes, finding the best gear on a budget, developing content that leaves people wanting more. He has been helping people understand technology and has been called "The Analogy King." His style is "edutainment" and you will always walk away with useful knowledge and insights. Dave Jackson is the original, and if you don't like the first episode you hear - give him two more and he'll change your mind.
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Now displaying: February, 2016
Feb 29, 2016

Podfest hapned this weekend in tamp Florida. Wow was it fun. I got to hang out with Hall of Fame podcasters like Danny Pena, and meet some people who are trying to get their podcast off the ground. I love, love, love, the podcast community. It's filled with helpful, loving ,caring people. I got to catch up with Dan and Jared from Podcast Movement, Glenn the Geek, some members of the School of Podcasting. I'd write more names, but I'm still in a coma from the Dramamine.

Cool Things About Podfest

Being a new event (this was year two) they had one track. This meant that all the attendees sat in the same room and the speakers would rotate in and out. We were strongly encouraged to network on breaks and sit in new locations. It was cool. I ran out of business cards, an luckily had a box of "stand by" business cards.

One of the coolest things were did was like Speed Networking. You had a time keeper at the table, and each person had 90 seconds to share their name, their podcast, and their target audience. Then each round you would go to a new table and meet more people. By the end of the session, you had pretty much met everyone in the room. This was one of the coolest things I've ever seen.

They had a schedule flowed nicely together. This lead to speakers often referring to something mentioned previously in the conference.

Great speakers. Simple. All brought value.

Relative sponsors: Audio editing services, marketing, interviewing, trademark, conferences, hosting, all were relevant to the audience.

I saw, felt, and participated in Content Marketing. I met Katie Krimitsos the night before. I saw her presentation on Facebook Goups, and she showed me how much more I could be doing. I will be a customer. 

When Will The School of Podcasting Open?

As God as my witness, ready or not, it will open next weekend 3/5

What am I doing? I'm reshot many of the videos. I've added quite a few videos, and I'm restructuring how I will do business. At this point (subject to change) I want to let a certain amount of people in at one point, and the close the doors so we can all kind of be "on the same page." Then I can help, encourage, and guide you through your process, while still providing value to current members through additional videos and live office hour webinars.

Creating Compelling Podcasts

Adjective: having a powerful and irresistible effect; requiring acute admiration, attention, or respect

How Podcasts are like Potatoes

You have instant potatoes out of a box. These are quick, easy, and cheap. The end result? Bland. You can make mashed potatoes from scratch. They take longer, it takes more effort, and they are more expensive to create. The result? They are delicious and your recipients want more.

It's Not About the Audio Quality

If you record with your laptop microphone, that's bad. I think we all can recognize audio that is distracting (if you make me adjust the volume during your podcast, we have a problem). You can purchase an Audio Technica 2100 for around $60 and have great audio. Be sure to get a pop filter (check out this package with a swing arm). Once you have that, MOVE ON.

I would listen to an 8-track tape of the Beatles because the content is good. My friend Paul Colligan from the Podcast Report records in all sorts of fun locations. Some are better than others. One time it sounded like Paul was recording fro ma submarine. I listened to every minute. Why? Because Paul makes me think.

On the other hand, Metallica put out and album with Lou Reed. Van Halen Put out an album with Gary Cherone.

One of more of the following need to happen:

  • Laugh
  • Cry
  • Think
  • Grown
  • Entertain
  • Educate

If none of the above is happening then don't press record.

Identify Your Audience

If you have a "Secret Santa" at your job and you get someone's name that you don't know you have two choices:

  1. Gift Card (quick, easy, fast - bland)
  2. Go ask someone who knows the person and get them a gift they want

Which one gets the best response?

This is why you have to know who your audience is, so you can go to where they are and listen to what they are talking about. Start of listening when you find your audience. Ask them what they might want to hear. Be sure to take notes using tools like Evernote or OneNote

The ADDIE Approach

Anaylize - Go research your audience
Design - Decide how you'r going to cover your topic
Develop - Buy the podcasting equipment, figure out what segments you will use.
Implement - Let a member of your target audience listen to the show.
Evaluate - Did they like it? Get feedback

Feedback is just that - feedback. It leads to failure if the feedback causes you to quit. Don't quit. Instead Analyze the feedback, design a new approach, develop a new version of your podcast, and have a target listener evaluate it. This goes on and on, forever.

How Many Downloads Should My Podcast Get?

Here is the equation:

Total Number of Downloads

X

Effective Production

=

Total Number of Downloads

If you have no value (bit focused, horrendous audio quality) then it doesn't matter how much you promote it. If you have great value, but don't tell anyone about it, that won't work either. This is why you need to record a couple of shows so you know how much time it takes to create an episode. THEN you can choose your publishing schedule.

Check out the Slides at www.schoolofpodcasting.com/503

Creating Compelling Podcasts from podcastcoach
Feb 22, 2016

Because of my Podcast: I'm Working For Libsyn - Dave Jackson

A couple of weeks ago I let you know that my "Day job" had gone away. A little update on the story, I reached out to the head of HR only to find she no longer works there, and I got an email stating that payroll would be postponed two days.  So there I was, thinking about getting into training and support. So I asked myself. What do I want to do for a living? I love podcasting. So in a nutshell.

I want to help people in the podcasting space.

Who is the biggest player in the podcast space?

Libsyn.com

I reached out to a person I knew (remember how it's all about relationships) and just let them know I was available if they needed someone. A little over two weeks later I was given a proposal to join their team.

I gladly accepted.

I can still do consulting, but you will now hear me give out a disclaimer that I am an employee of Libsyn. You will hear me give out my promo code of sopfree for Libsyn on this show, but not at a trade show where I'm acting as a Libsyn employee. For those who are new to my show, I've been a big fan of Libsyn as well as Blubrry, and Spreaker for years. I think the insights I get from working in support will help me created better content for you on this show, as well as additional documentation for Libsyn.

I've always wanted to make a living around podcasting, and now I can. I can do podcasting as my full-time gig, and my night time hobby. Wait, that's Ray's line.

Because of My Podcast I Quit My Day Job - Jim Harold

Every Saturday at 10:30 AM I do a live call-in show called "Ask the Podcast Coach" at www.askthepdocastcoach.com/live and this week Jim asked a question about the controversy over measuring podcasts (see this episode of the Podcasters Roundtable ) and once he came on I got to talk to him and found out.

  • Jim previously a sales guy for radio
  • Jim now does a podcasting full time at jimharold.com

I've already reached out to Jim and we will be doing a deep dive on next week's show.

Anchor.fm Vs Voxer Vs Clammr Vs Speakpipe Vs Voicemail

Today we are joined by Chris Nesi  (www.chrisnesi.com) from the House of Ed Tech podcast. Chris is well versed in Voxer. As a member of the School of Podcasting Chris has shown me he really enjoys voxer. So when this new tool (Anchor) came on the scene and everyone was going nuts over it, I wanted to get Chris's opinion. In the end, they are different tools for different audiences who are looking for different results.

The world is all a flutter over the Anchor app for iOs. This is an app that allows you to sign in via your twitter account and create audio. People can follow you, and you can follow them. You can record a "wave" and people can reply. This is all public. You can them embed your wav on your website, like this.

See www.schoolofpodcasting.com/502

Speakpipe.com

Originally I wasn't going to include Speakpipe in this discussion, but if we are talking about getting feedback from your audience, I would look like a fool not to include it. Speakpipe is a way for you to put a button on your website for people to click on it, and using their microphone leave a message. When you get the message you can listen to it, download it, or click reply and send a message back to the audience member. It's free, with a premium version for more storage. Check out speakpipe.com

Anchor.fm

I can see this being used to get feedback from your audience. While this is already easy with tools like speakpipe, when someone leaves a message with speakpipe, you can reply to them as well. This is all public. With Anchor, the conversation is public so everyone can hear the conversation and bring their point of view. The bad news for podcasters is once you get the audio, there is no download option. Now you are stuck with hitting play on your phone and recording it with another device. For me, I shared a link to myself, played the wave on the web, and recorded it using Hindenburg journalist (you can go into settings and tell it to record "other applications." Anchor - True public radio - Anchor FM Inc.

Voxer.com

Voxer is also a free app (with a paid pro version with additional perks) that turns your phone into a walkie talkie. It is cool, and you can invite people into groups. This again creates a community feeling. You can share audio, video, text, and images. With a group it is only public to the group. You can private message each individual if you'd like. The nice thing about voxer is it works on all platforms. You can even just use their website. I do love the fact that you can listen to messages at up 3X speed. With Voxer, you have a public forum if you want it (with only invited guests) or private message that are easy to listen to and easy to download. Every time I play with Voxer I feel I should create a group for the School of Podcasting. Check out the app at Voxer Walkie Talkie Messenger - Voxer LLC

Clammr.com

Clammr is a fun tool to help spread the word about your show. You can use the free app (or their website) to create clips up to 24 seconds. When Clammr was first launched, creating a clammr was a bit cumbersome. They have improved this since the launch, and they've added the ability to use their website (for those not using an iOs device). If someone likes a clammr when they hear it, they are emailed a link to the rest of the episode. You can create widgets to show your favorite clammrs. They look like this. see schoolofpodcasting.com/502

I can also share a playlist via a text link So where clammr is for the audience to help spread the podcast to their friends, tools like Anchor are for getting their opinion or feedback from the show. Check out the clammr at here Clammr Radio – Discover Podcasts, Music, & News Headlines - Clammr, Inc.

Voicemail

I have a number through PodcastVoicemail.com (Kall8) that costs me $2 a month plus .06 a minute. I've never had a bill over $4, and the audio is "meh" but it's simple and it works for those who are not too technically gifted.

What Does My New Position Mean For the School of Podcasting?

As I'm working for Libsyn.com there are a few that will happen, but very little will change. When I write and talk on my podcast, I am writing as Dave Jackson the Professional Podcast Mentor. I have been delivering objective facts about podcasting, technology, and content for almost 11 years. On this blog I can tell you to use the coupon code sopfree to get a free month at Libsyn.com, or Blubrry.com or Spreaker.com. If i'm at a trade show as an "Official Libsyn Employee" I won't be giving out promo codes (if I want to keep my job), and I won't be giving out promo codes to my competition. You will now hear me use a disclaimer when I talk about hosting companies and explain that I work for Libsyn. But in the end, I've always tried to deliver the facts, and let you make informed decisions. For anyone who has listened to my show from 2005, I've been a big fan of Libsyn before they had an affiliate program, and before I was an employee. So in the end, not much is going to change for the podcast.

What I hope to gain is a better understanding of the podcasting community, the industry, and bring that information to the podcast, and to my tutorials. Some of those tutorials may end up here, or at Libsyn.com or both.

When I lost my job on February 5th, I asked myself, "What do you want to do with your life." I've been a teacher for 20+ years. I've worked in customer support, and tech support. My goal was to make a living around podcasting. My first thought was I could do it on my own by doing consulting full time, or I could go work for a company like Libsyn, Blubrry, or Spreaker. While like all of these companies, I've always been the biggest fan of Libsyn. I also love chocolate ice cream and it will win over any other flavor until Oreo Cookie ice cream is available. There is no bad choice there. I reached out to Rob Walch the VP of Podcasting Relations (and someone I've known for 11 years) and just let him know I was available. If something happened I would do Libsyn full time and do consulting in the evenings and weekends. If something didn't happen, I would go full time consulting,  and maybe get a part time job doing something else.

When I took the job as the Director of the New Media Expo, what I ended up getting were relationships. I believe this job will get me more in touch with potential guests, insights, and a view I wouldn't have if I didn't accept the position.

I said before, I wanted to make a living helping people podcast and now I will. I will bring my knowledge right back to this microphone.

No Matter What System you Use..

No matter what tool you use, you will still need to ask for communication. You will need to make it super easy to use. Also keep in mind the more tools you use, the more tools you need to check. The worst thing you can do is ask for interaction and then ignore it.

Hot of the Presses: A New Podcast From the School of Podcasting

Living-Vet-LIfe-MapRob Kerns new Living the Vet Life Podcast is for a podcast dedicated to making sure Veterans are getting all of their benefits. Check it out at http://livingthevetlife.com/ check it out in iTunes

Rob's got two episodes out and it displays lots of promise to help veterans get what they deserve.

 

 

Podcast Mentorship 1 Yr Subscription Starts March 5th

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If you are looking to take a serious stab at podcasting, join Dave for a YEAR as he works side by side with you. For more information, go to www.podcastmentorship.com

Mentioned in this show

Jeff Bradburry Teachercast.net

Ray Ortega PodcastersStudio.com

Chris Nesi

Speakpipe

Clammr 

PodcastVoicemail.com

Voxer LLC

Anchor

Libsyn.com

Blubrry

livingthevetlife.com

Hindenburg Journalist

Podcast MentorShip

Feb 15, 2016

With so many people focusing on New and Noteworthy, I wanted to see how many people use New and Noteworthy. So I asked people how they found new podcasts and here is what they said.

The number one way was hearing the podcaster being interviewed on another podcast. This data is from 100 respondents from my email list, and from social media. So it order with the number one answer first it was

I heard them interviewed on another podcast

I searched the app for my topic

I heard about it from a friend (word of mouth)

Other

The Internet (Google, Bing) Search

The "other" responses were (and I'm summarizing) more or less "Word of mouth." Meaning the podcast host they were listening to mentioned them, or they heard about it on Twitter, Pinterest, etc.

So if one of the top ways to grow your audience is to appear on other podcasts, how do you get booked on other shows? Well, we are going to dig into a smart way of setting yourself up to be booked on other podcasts.

How To Get Booked as A Guest On a Podcast?

OK, there must be some new course, or guru telling people how to contact people to be potential guests. Here is the format

  1. Tell people how much you love the show
  2. Tell them your story
  3. Tell them what topic you can talk about and how much my audience is going to benefit.
  4. Kiss the butt of the host and tell them what an honor it would be on the show.
  5. Drop a hint about the book or course you have, and how my audience would benefit.
  6. Promise to promote.

They are missing one key ingredient

GO AND LISTEN TO THE SHOW

When you start off the email with “I have heard some fantastic things about your radio show, congratulations on your success!”

Again, do some homework, or better yet, go by the book Stop Chasing Influencers: The True Path To Building Your Business and Living Your Dream

Strategies For Securing a Guest Spot on Other Podcasts

Search for your topic in iTunes, Google, etc. the idea is to see who is in the space. Who is the leader in your space? Search for their name in iTunes and see what podcasts they have appeared.  You could search for New and Noteworthy as these people are probably more New than Noteworthy (and hungry for guests) Realize your interview will be evergreen. So if someone goes back to get the back catalog, you will be included.

Find influencers in your niche: Look for books on your topic in Amazon, and in Amazon there is a "Customers also bought these items" area. You should probably see other authors names who are also involved with your topic.

Make a list and check it twice

When you find a podcast, look and see the date of their last episode. If they have podfaded, you might consider contacting them to see if you could take over the show. In general, people who haven't put out a show in months, are more than likely not coming back.

Start a spreadsheet with the following information

  • Website Address
  • Twitter Handle
  • e-mail address

The average Twitter followers per user is 208. According to an article on Sumome you can look at Twitter followers using the following scale:

  • H = Huge = 100k+ Followers
  • L = Large = 10K+ Followers
  • M = Medium = 1k+ Followers
  • S = Getting Started = less than 1k followers

Add these people to your list and make how you found them (they will want to know). Obviously, put if they have a podcast or not. If they don't, you may still want to develop a relationship with them so they can appear on YOUR podcast.

Getting Ready For the Initial Contact

So to determine if you are a good fit for their show, you need to listen to it. There is no way around this if you want to do it right.  Does this podcast focus on people who would enjoy your topic? If yes, then we need to get ready to contact them. If not, then we won't focus on them now.

Don't Try to Close the Deal

Instead of sending an email, and asking to come on the show. Why not follow them on Twitter and retweet one of their tweets? Why not leave a comment on the blog. The beginning of every relationship begins with a conversation. This way when you do contact them, you won't be quite the stranger.

Honesty is Refreshing

See if you can get an introduction. See who is following this person on twitter or LinkedIn and see if you can get an introduction.

Instead of telling me great my show is, why not be honest? Tell me you just discovered the show, and tell me why - specifically - in a way that proves you listened - you would be a good fit for my show. Realize the podcaster is going to have to figure out if you're going to bring value, and if you're a good fit. If you've done your homework, you can answer that question for them (and save them time).

You could send an email with something along the lines of "Hey (name), I just got done listening to (episode name) and I have to tell you (specific item that proves you listened) I wanted to let you know as someone who has been involved with (the topic of the podcast) I'm really enjoying the show. "

If you want them to take a look at you, write about their episode on your blog and link to it. Then send them a link to the post. Now you're not just a listener, you're a content creator, and I'm pretty sure they are going to click the "ABOUT" button when they visit.

Think of this as "Courting" your potential future interview.

Why Should I Take This Much Effort For One Interview?

You can “Spray and Pray” that someone will respond. Spend time talking to people who (apparently) will have anybody on their show. Waste their audience time, and your time as well. The good news it didn’t take any effort to pull this off. The bad news is it isn’t very effective. You’re busy, but not productive. There is a difference. Don’t confuse the two.

The other way of doing this is to find a show with the topics you want to talk about, and listen to them and see if you might be a good fit. If you think there is, then leave a comment on the post you listened to and bring value. See if the host replies (you want a host who is connected with his/her audience). Then later, after you listen to a second episode you might consider sending them another email. Talk about some details to prove you listened and bring some value to the conversation. Maybe you have details that they didn’t share in the episode. Maybe you have a resource that could be of value. Bring something to the table that will benefit the host. When the host benefits, you benefit. Why? Because as a podcast host, we serve our audience. We want our audience to benefit. When you deliver value, the host will want you to do the same thing with their audience.

Why don’t people do this? Because contacting people on a personal basis takes TIME. Time is something most of us don’t have. Why don’t we have more time? Because we’re BUSY talking to people that aren’t a good fit. Because we’re drafting the perfect form letter to blast to hundreds of potential podcasters.

Stand Out in the Crowd

If you want to stand out and have people BEGGING YOU to come on the show, do your homework. Write an email that shows you took the time to listen, and you’ve already done the work for the host. They don’t have to figure out if you’re a good guest for the show; you’ve already done it for them. You will STAND OUT.

It’s Not Spray and Pray.

It’s all about Relationships.

Relationships take time. If you’re too “busy”, stop using Spray and Pray, and start working smarter. Start standing out from the crowd by doing your homework and find podcasts that fit your topic, and success will come your way.

Podcast Mentorship Year Long Podcast Course

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Is this you?

You don’t know where to start or what steps are required to turn that idea into a reality.

You have a lot of ideas to choose from and you don’t want to choose the wrong one.

Your fear of failure outweighs your fear of not getting started.

You’re not sure if you’re qualified.

You don’t want to let others down.

You’ve discovered others who have executed a similar idea.

You don’t have the resources you need to get started.

You’re just not sure if it’s going to work.

Podcast Mentorship will meet twice a week for the first six weeks, and twice a month for the next 10 months. You will communicate via a private slack group, and you will full access to the School of Podcasting so you are never alone.

Podcast Mentorship is where I work side by side with you as we (together) identify your target audience, and the problems they need solved, and the information they are starving to hear. When we launch your podcast it will be a like breath of fresh air to your audience. It will be like delivering the perfect gift who has been waiting years for it.

For more information go to www.podcastmentorship.com

Ready to start now? Order Today

Mentioned in this show

http://www.jobsearchthatworks.com/

www.askthepodcastcoach.com

 

Feb 8, 2016

If you're new to the School of Podcasting, when Dave hits a milestone like 100, 200, 300, 400, he breaks format and tries to do something that is educational, entertaining, and slightly weird. Today being that it is both my 500th episode of the School of Podcasting, and my 51st birthday, (and the fact that last week was Groundhog's Day), I am taking my creativity and love of the movie Groundhog's Day (the story is a guy has to relive the same day over and over, rent it here) and joining it with the story of Jack Davidson and his friend Scooter as they try to launch a podcast.

We also here snippets of past shows at the start of the show.

Special thanks to Adam Curry of the No Agenda Show for loaning me their birthday jingle. Check out their awesome podcast at www.noagendashow.com

Also thanks to Steve Stewart of the No Debt, No Credit, No Problems podcast for kicking off the show, and to Kim Kracji of the onthetablepodcasts.com for being my female voice in the "podcasting commercial". I knew I could count on you both.

Look Back Memory Lane 00:38

Episode 500 Begins 2:00

We cover a story about a man named Jack Davidson. It’s his birthday, he’s gone through some life changes, and he’s thinking of starting a business. He is realizing that you only have so much time on the planet, and he wants to make a difference. His biggest fear in life is being insignificant, or leaving no legacy behind. His mind is whirling today about his future. This has been spurred on by the fact that he is turning 51 today

Morning Burger hit :4:00

Hey It's Your Birthday Version 1 5:01

Podcasting Commercial 5:34

First Jack tries using a free media host that limits your bandwidth - Bad idea

Binky and the Whiz take over the No Agenda Show 8:44

Jack purchases blue snowball microphones only to find out these don't work good in a non-silent environment and its hard to have two usb microphone plugged into one computer.

Whet Bread the Big Lie 11:55

Hey It's Your Birthday Version 2 15:15

Jack and Scooter learn that you should setup an agreement to identify who does what, and if there is any money who gets paid, etc

Hey It's Your Birthday Version 3 18:50

Jack and Scooter lose their friendship after arguing over the money with their podcast.

Jack goes solo, and tries multiple hosts, platforms, and equipment.

Jack and Scooter come to an agreement

Final Thoughts on Episode 500 23:20

What did we learn today?

  1. Blue snowball microphones are not a great choice even though 1000 websites say so. They are not a great fit for podcasters. There are better options
  2. Copying a company that you may be talking about on twitter is a strategy you might want to try
  3. Be sure to have expectation regarding money and responsibilities in place if you have a co-host.
  4. We learned that the only thing more annoying than Binky and the Whiz is hearing the same clip of Binky and the Whiz over and over is quite annoying.
  5. We learned that the more tied Dave gets, the less he stays in character
  6. And lastly if your your episode last longer than four hours, you should always call your doctor.

The Not Ready For FM Players

Podcast Sally 34:10

Mentioned in this Episode

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Steve Stewart 

On the Table Podcast (for toastmasters)

No Agenda Show

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Feb 1, 2016

Last week we talk about being a "hobby podcast" and that you can be a hero to someone. We mentioned that you do NOT have to make money with your podcast. Today we are going the other way and looking at making money with your podcast. So let's start right there.

YOU DON'T MAKE MONEY WITH YOUR PODCAST. YOU MAKE MONEY WITH THE RELATIONSHIP YOU BUILD WITH YOUR PODCAST

This is why it takes time. In the same way that it takes time to develop a relationship, it takes time to build an audience that will like and trust you. Things that can speed up this process:

  1. Create content that is valuable.
  2. Come across in a way that build confidence.
  3. Deliver it on a regular basis (so people depend on you).
  4. Let them know you.

Strategies for Making Money with Your Podcast

1. Sell your own product

This is by far the most lucrative because people know, like and trust you. This can be a book, a course, consulting, etc.

2. Refer to other products through affiliate links

Pick a product that matches the audience. Preferably one that you actually like so you can talk open and honestly about the product. Many people use Amazon. or Audible as well.

3. Donations

You can put a paypal button on your site, or websites like Patreon make it easy to build a community by rewarding them for different levels of support. Be careful with the reward and make sure you don't spread yourself too thin.

4. Sponsorship

When you get over 5,000 download per episode, you can start thinking about getting a "big" sponsor (squarespace). As 92% of podcasters are nowhere near that number you are not out of luck. You can find smaller businesses that may be looking for more of a branding play. Check out my interview with Glenn The Geek who is making a living with sponsors by making sure his sponsors fit his audience and he gets them involved.

Selling Digital Downloads

Check out this super powerful shopping cart plugin that allows you to safely sell digital downloads

Gumroad is a handy website that make's it easy to sell digital downloads if you're not using Wordpress. Selz.com is another great looking shopping cart.

Monetizing With Membership Sites

The School of Podcasting was founded in 2005 and I used Digital Access Pass to to make sure the general public could not access my material. I also used it to manage my affiliate program, and e-mail m members. It created coupons for discounts, and generated reports. Is is the cheapest platform? No. But the money you save using different plugins is wasted in the time you spend trying to get them all to work together.

Today I interview Ravi Jayagopal from Digital Access Pass and the author of the book Subscribe Me: Making, Marketing & Monetizing Online Digital Content with Membership Sites, Online Courses and Recurring Subscriptions

The biggest advantage of a membership site is you can build it once, and then sell it many times. Digital Access Pass even has a "drip" feature (now copied by many, but Ravi was the inventor) that allows you to provide your members content over a period of time (instead of giving it to them all at once ).

Today we learn this about membership sites:

1. There is more than just putting up content and protecting it.
2. You still have to bring value to your audience.
3. You still need to promote it. It's not a "build it and they will come" world.
4. You still need to provide new content to get them to stick around.

Check out Ravi's podcast at www.subscribeme.fm

Where Monetization Stumbles

You start out not caring about money, and you turn on the microphone and just wing it. Then later you want to make money with your podcast.

You topic doesn't lend itself to sponsors (too hot of a topic). This doesn't mean you can't get a sponsor, it means it may be tougher.

A podcaster wants to start monetizing after 4 weeks and they haven't developed that know like and trust, or an audience.

Mentioned in this Podcast

Shepodcasts.com

Podcaster's Studio

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